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'Total eclipse of the facts': Lemon reacts to speech

CNN - 24 min 24 sec ago
CNN anchor Don Lemon responded with shock to President Donald Trump's defiant speech at a rally in Phoenix Tuesday night.

iPhone 8 Event Date Rumored for September 12, With Device Launching September 22

MacRumors - 34 min 56 sec ago
As we approach the end of August and the time that Apple typically sends out invitations for its annual iPhone reveal event, a new report by Mac4Ever [Google Translate] has pegged this year's iPhone 8, iPhone 7s, and iPhone 7s Plus event date as Tuesday, September 12. The site then predicted the three new iPhone models will go on sale a week and a half later, on Friday, September 22.

The weekdays match a pattern that Apple historically follows each year, setting an event on a Tuesday or Wednesday, and then actually launching the new iPhone a few weeks later, on a Friday. Mac4Ever's prediction is sourced by information gained from a few French telephone carriers, but at this point any general event date guess on a Tuesday or Wednesday in early September could end up as the winning date chosen by Apple, so continue to take these event rumors with a grain of salt.


Apple's financial quarter ends Saturday, September 30, so it's likely that the company intends to have its iPhone 8 event early in September, followed by the launch a week or so later. This would provide enough leeway between the launch and the end of the quarter to account for a boost in iPhone sales figures.

For this reason, in the first week of September, Wednesday, September 6 is an option for the event, although Tuesday, September 5 is less likely due to its close proximity to Labor Day the day prior, which would likely require press to travel on the holiday. If Apple held an event on September 6, the iPhones could potentially launch Friday, September 15.

The second week of September includes Mac4Ever's predicted date of September 12, and Wednesday, September 13 could also potentially be a possibility for the event. Either of these dates suggest an iPhone debut on Friday, September 22.

Looking back at the past few years of iPhone launches, the previously mentioned dates are most likely when users can expect Apple to announce and release the iPhone 8, iPhone 7s, and iPhone 7s Plus.

  • 2012 -- iPhone 5 -- announced September 12, released September 21

  • 2013 -- iPhone 5s/5c -- announced September 10, released September 20

  • 2014 -- iPhone 6 -- announced September 9, released September 19

  • 2015 -- iPhone 6s -- announced September 9, released September 25

  • 2016 -- iPhone 7 -- announced September 7, released September 16

  • The September iPhone event is also rumored to see the unveiling of a 4K Apple TV and potentially the Apple Watch Series 3, although when those products would launch is unclear. The same event will also see Apple delve deeper into new features surrounding iOS 11, macOS High Sierra, watchOS 4, and tvOS 11.

    Related Roundup: iPhone 8
    Tag: mac4ever.com
    Discuss this article in our forums

    Trump's dishonest rant about his Charlottesville comments

    Washington Post - 40 min 23 sec ago
    Trump ignores his most controversial comments and invents plenty of details.

    What you need to know about former Arizona sheriff Joe Arpaio’s record on illegal immigration

    Washington Post - 40 min 23 sec ago
    We take you through the saga of Joe Arpaio's legal controversies stemming from his illegal-immigration crackdown.

    Mariah Carey has 'always had low self-esteem'

    CNN - 47 min 43 sec ago
    Even divas have their moments of insecurity.

    Former Russian envoy downplays Trump campaign contacts

    CNN - 55 min 6 sec ago
    Russia's former ambassador to the United States Sergey Kislyak downplayed his contact with members of the Trump campaign on Wednesday, calling allegations that he worked as a spymaster and tried to recruit people within President Donald Trump's orbit "nonsense" during an exclusive interview with CNN.

    Giant waves explain shifting iron clouds on brown dwarfs

    Futurity.org - 57 min 46 sec ago

    Researchers have a new model for explaining how clouds move and change shape in brown dwarfs. The work points to giant waves that cause large-scale movement of particles in their atmosphere.

    Brown dwarfs, dim objects less massive than the sun but more massive than Jupiter, have powerful winds and clouds—specifically, hot patchy clouds made of iron droplets and silicate dust. Scientists recently realized these giant clouds can move and thicken or thin surprisingly rapidly, in less than an Earth day, but did not understand why until now.

    https://photojournal.jpl.nasa.gov/archive/PIA21752_BrownDwarfDataPlot.mp4

    The new study also suggests these clouds are organized in bands confined to different latitudes, traveling with different speeds in different bands.

    “This is the first time we have seen atmospheric bands and waves in brown dwarfs,” says lead author Daniel Apai, an associate professor of astronomy and planetary sciences at the University of Arizona’s Steward Observatory.

    Just as in Earth’s ocean, different types of waves can form in planetary atmospheres. For example, in Earth’s atmosphere, very long waves mix cold air from the polar regions to mid-latitudes, which often lead clouds to form or dissipate.

    The distribution and motions of the clouds on brown dwarfs in this study are more similar to those seen on Jupiter, Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune. Neptune has cloud structures that follow banded paths too, but its clouds are made of ice. Observations of Neptune from NASA’s Kepler spacecraft, operating in its K2 mission, were important in this comparison between the planet and brown dwarfs.

    Due to their similarity to giant exoplanets, brown dwarfs are windows into planetary systems beyond our own.

    “The atmospheric winds of brown dwarfs seem to be more like Jupiter’s familiar regular pattern of belts and zones than the chaotic atmospheric boiling seen on the Sun and many other stars,” says study coauthor Mark Marley at NASA’s Ames Research Center in California’s Silicon Valley.

    Brown dwarfs can be thought of as failed stars because they are too small to fuse chemical elements in their cores. They can also be thought of as “super planets” because they are more massive than Jupiter, yet have roughly the same diameter.

    Like gas giant planets, brown dwarfs are mostly made of hydrogen and helium, but they are often found apart from any planetary systems. In a 2014 study using Spitzer, scientists found that brown dwarfs commonly have atmospheric storms.

    Due to their similarity to giant exoplanets, brown dwarfs are windows into planetary systems beyond our own. It is easier to study brown dwarfs than planets because they often do not have a bright host star that obscures them.

    “It is likely the banded structure and large atmospheric waves we found in brown dwarfs will also be common in giant exoplanets,” Apai says.

    Why brown dwarfs stay little ‘starlets’

    Using Spitzer, scientists monitored brightness changes in six brown dwarfs over more than a year, observing each of them rotate 32 times. As a brown dwarf rotates, its clouds move in and out of the hemisphere seen by the telescope, causing changes in the brightness of the brown dwarf. Scientists then analyzed these brightness variations to explore how silicate clouds are distributed in the brown dwarfs.

    Researchers had been expecting these brown dwarfs to have elliptical storms resembling Jupiter’s Great Red Spot, caused by high-pressure zones.

    The Great Red Spot has been present in Jupiter for hundreds of years and changes very slowly: Such “spots” could not explain the rapid changes in brightness that scientists saw while observing these brown dwarfs. The brightness levels of the brown dwarfs varied markedly just over the course of an Earth day.

    To make sense of the ups and downs of brightness, scientists had to rethink their assumptions about what was going on in the brown dwarf atmospheres. The best model to explain the variations involves large waves, propagating through the atmosphere with different periods. These waves would make the cloud structures rotate with different speeds in different bands.

    Researcher Theodora Karalidi used a supercomputer and a new computer algorithm to create maps of how clouds travel on these brown dwarfs.

    “When the peaks of the two waves are offset, over the course of the day there are two points of maximum brightness,” Karalidi says. “When the waves are in sync, you get one large peak, making the brown dwarf twice as bright as with a single wave.”

    Is this a lonely planet or a light-weight star?

    The results explain the puzzling behavior and brightness changes that researchers previously saw. The next step is to try to better understand what causes the waves that drive cloud behavior.

    The researchers report their findings in the journal Science.

    JPL manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Science operations are conducted at the Spitzer Science Center at Caltech in Pasadena, California. Spacecraft operations are based at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Littleton, Colorado. Data are archived at the Infrared Science Archive housed at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.

    Source: University of Arizona

    The post Giant waves explain shifting iron clouds on brown dwarfs appeared first on Futurity.

    Rewriting history: Trump pours gas on the culture wars

    CNN - 1 hour 6 min ago
    Donald Trump just showed why even some Republicans question whether he has the temperament and the capacity to serve as President.

    U.N. Panel Condemns Trump’s Response to Charlottesville Violence

    NY Times - 1 hour 12 min ago
    The anti-racism committee invoked its urgent warning procedures for the first time since an outbreak of killings last year in Burundi.

    Samsung Reveals Galaxy Note 8 With Dual Rear Cameras and 6.3-Inch AMOLED 'Infinity Display'

    MacRumors - 1 hour 13 min ago
    At its "Unpacked" event in New York City today, Samsung unveiled the all-new Galaxy Note 8 smartphone, following months of speculation about the device's August debut. The event began with a recap video of the Note line's history, including user testimonies following the Note 7's fire-catching scandal and how they continued to support Samsung during the recall.

    Looking forward at the new device, the Galaxy Note 8 has a 6.3-inch Quad HD+ Super AMOLED "Infinity Display," with an edge-to-edge screen that represents the largest screen ever on any Note device. The display has an 18.5:9 aspect ratio, which allows users to see more content than ever before, according to Samsung. This includes access to a new multitasking feature called "App Pair," which lets users create custom pairs of their favorite apps on the Edge side panel, simultaneously launching two apps to interact with them at once.

    “We appreciate the relentless passion of the Note community. They’ve been a constant inspiration to us, and we designed the new Note for them,” said DJ Koh, president of Mobile Communications Business, Samsung Electronics. “From the Infinity Display to the enhanced S Pen, to the powerful Dual Camera, Note8 lets people do things they never thought were possible.” The Galaxy Note 8 comes with a new and enhanced S Pen with a finer tip and improved pressure sensitivity. When using the S Pen, users can send "Live Messages" to handwrite text messages -- and add in special effects -- within the text message app. An enhanced screen-off mode lets users quickly jot down notes when the smartphone is turned off, and then save the note to view later.

    On the photography side of things, the Galaxy Note 8 has one 8MP front-facing camera and two 12MP rear cameras, and includes optical image stabilization on both of the rear cameras. The rear-facing cameras include one wide-angle f/1.7 lens and one telephoto f/2.4 lens, while the front camera has an aperture of f/1.7.

    A "Live Focus" mode lets users take a picture and control the depth of field of everything surrounding the main subject of the image, so users can adjust the bokeh effect before and after the photo is taken.

    Expanding the ecosystem of the Note smartphone line, Samsung also introduced "Samsung DeX," which lets the smartphone communicate with a user's PC to seamlessly transfer between working on the go and at home or in an office.


    Additionally, the Galaxy Note 8 is water and dust resistant (IP68), includes fast wireless charging, a 3,300 mAh battery, and various biometric authentication options (iris and fingerprint scanning). Samsung's new smartphone has 6GB of RAM, a 10nm processor, and 64GB/128GB/256GB of internal storage, depending on market and carrier availability. The device also keeps the standard 3.5mm headphone jack.

    A few websites have already gotten to go hands-on with the Galaxy Note 8, including The Verge, Engadget, CNET, and USA Today. Many sites pointed out the similarities of the device's dual-lens camera system to that of the iPhone 7 Plus, with Engadget noting, "Samsung has a camera setup excellent enough to make iPhone owners consider switching."

    Those interested will be able to pre-order the Galaxy Note 8 starting tomorrow, August 24, and the smartphone will then go on sale September 15. In the United States, the device will be available in Midnight Black and Orchid Gray for carrier and Unlocked by Samsung versions, and customers will be able to purchase it at all of the major carriers, as well as Samsung.com, Best Buy, Target and Walmart.

    According to a Verizon press release, the Samsung Galaxy Note 8 will cost $40/month for 24 months, or $960 at retail. The Verge reports that the smartphone will cost $930 at T-Mobile and $950 at AT&T.

    For any original Note 7 owners, CNET noted that Samsung will be offering a discount on Note 8 devices: purchasing the smartphone through Samsung.com will allow previous Note 7 users to receive an instant trade-in credit of up to $425 when upgrading a current phone to Note 8. In addition, anyone at all who purchases a Note 8 between August 24 and September 24, 2017 has the chance to get either a free Samsung Gear 360 camera or a free Galaxy Foundation kit with a 128GB memory card and fast wireless charger.

    For even more information on the Samsung Galaxy Note 8, check out the company's website.

    Tags: Samsung, Galaxy Note 8
    Discuss this article in our forums

    Trump to Congress: Fund the Wall or I’ll Shut the Government

    NY Times - 1 hour 17 min ago
    President Trump at a campaign-style rally in Phoenix promised he would shut down the government if Congress does not fund a wall on the southern border.

    Martha’s Vineyard Has a Nourishing Magic for Black Americans

    NY Times - 1 hour 18 min ago
    My first vacation on the island was bartered. That was seven years ago, and I’ve been drawn back every summer since.

    Potential hurricane threatens Texas

    CNN - 1 hour 20 min ago
    Harvey is making a comeback.

    Mel B walks off 'America's Got Talent'

    CNN - 1 hour 31 min ago
    When it comes to being a comedian, Melanie "Mel B" Brown thinks Simon Cowell is all wet.

    How a Shadowy Imam Evaded Scrutiny and Forged the Barcelona Cell

    NY Times - 1 hour 33 min ago
    Abdelbaki Essati, believed to be the recruiter behind the attacks in Spain, had deep links with Islamic extremists and seems to have learned their methods well.

    Mayor says Trump is dividing America

    CNN - 1 hour 34 min ago
    Phoenix Mayor Greg Stanton was not a fan of President Donald Trump's speech Tuesday in his city.

    Kim Wall Is Confirmed Dead as Danish Inventor Is Investigated

    NY Times - 1 hour 36 min ago
    Ms. Wall, a journalist, disappeared after boarding a submarine designed by Peter Madsen, who says he buried her at sea after an accident on the vessel.

    Trump blames the media for nearly all of his problems as president

    Washington Post - 1 hour 40 min ago
    At a rally in Phoenix, about the only time he mentioned the racial tensions and violence from Charlottesville was in the context of defending himself.
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